Cessna P210 – Inadvertent SLD Encounter

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Cessna P210 NH SLD Conditions 002

Cessna P210 NH SLD Conditions 001

A TKS-equipped Cessna P210 en route from Oregon had an inadvertent SLD icing encounter at 14,000 feet and exited by climbing.

TKS is not approved for flight into SLD conditions. In an inadvertent SLD encounter such as the one pictured above, a TKS system does have capabilities beyond other ice protection systems. Even with a TKS system, one should always take immediate steps to exit icing conditions should they be encountered.

Find TKS for Your Aircraft

CAV Ice Protection has introduced a new product for the OEM market named SLD Guard, an airborne anti-ice system designed to meet new FAA aircraft certification regulations addressing FIKI conditions containing Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD).

Jim N. – Beechcraft 55 Baron FIKI TKS Testimonial

Jim N. lives primarily flies in the Upper Midwest. He is the owner of a 1980 Beechcraft 55 Baron with Flight Into Known Icing (FIKI) certified TKS Ice Protection.

Jim N Beechcraft B55 Baron TKS Ice Protection System

 

Why did you choose TKS?

I originally bought the Baron specifically because I fly over Lake Michigan on a regular basis. A single, even with a parachute, simply does not compare, as survival times in the lake are short, even in the summertime. There have been countless times where there have been forecasts for icing, and the TKS has given me the confidence and ability to fly through. It simply becomes a non-issue.

What does TKS do for your mission?

TKS has been simple to operate and maintain, and has worked flawlessly for years. I would not travel in my Baron without TKS. It has expanded and improved my dispatch rate and increased both my confidence as well as safety. It was well worth the investment.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

There was one episode that I recall in particular. I was flying westward across Michigan and then Lake Michigan one afternoon in late winter. Everyone on the frequency was reporting ice accumulation, from the surface and well up into the flight levels. ATC was doing their best to accommodate everyone, but it was pretty clear they didn’t have much to work with and nowhere to put people. There were low ceilings everywhere, and then in what seemed to be an instant I started to pick up mixed ice, and quickly. I had already primed the TKS system and was ready. I turned on the TKS, and as usual no further ice accumulated on the wings or tail surfaces. The stuff that had accumulated rapidly turned to slush and fell away. The windshield iced up but was readily freed of ice with TKS from the spray bar. I could see ice covering the landing lights in the wings but all of the visible flying surfaces were clean. There was no risk of runback ice as well. Radio reception started weakening as ice covered the antennas, but a switch to the second radio addressed this problem. I knew from the Nexrad and XM Radio that it was actually clear near the Michigan border of the lake, so I decided to continue. As I crossed Lake Michigan it was fully night, but I could see the ice start to disappear from the windshield. When I landed, there was nearly an inch of mixed ice on the radome and spinners but everything else was entirely clear. Without the TKS I would have been forced to land and spend the night, or possibly faced an even worse outcome. I do not believe the TKS system is for droning along in ice for prolonged periods of time, but is ideally suited for brief periods, knowing there are clear areas ahead.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

TKS is clearly superior to boots. It does not require maintenance, periodic replacement, and does it not lose any airspeed. It does not require an expensive hot plate or an additional alcohol tank to fill in the nose.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Baron FIKI

 

Marc Mosier – Trans-Atlantic Ferry Pilot TKS Testimonial

Marc Mosier lives in Virginia and primarily flies as a trans-Atlantic ferry pilot. He has delivered a dozen Cirrus SR22s with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection and Mooney M20s with No-Hazard or FIKI-certified TKS.

N333LP Departure from LFQB Bernard&MarcMosier-E

How did you get started in aviation?

Forty years ago I started as a recreational pilot and later became a ferry pilot.

Why did you choose TKS?

TKS was the only approved way of adding ice protection to a Mooney that I owned.

What does TKS do for your mission?

It allows me to launch where I would not launch if I did not have the guarantee that I would be able to survive an icing encounter.

Marc-Mosier-Translatlantic-001-E

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

You don’t cross the Atlantic without having memorable icing encounters. I have crossed the pond several times with non-FIKI Cirrus. In doing so, I have picked up ice several times and have been able to shed it every time.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

Yes, I have had experience with boots and electrothermal.

The main advantage of TKS is that you don’t burden the airplane with weight if you don’t need it. In the summertime you can drain some of the fluid because you need less. [We recommend you prime the TKS system year-round once a month.] The weight penalty is fairly minimal. The drag penalty is also fairly minimal compared to boots. And maintenance is lighter than it would be with boots which you have to replace after a while.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection

 

Dave Bosworth – FedEx Feeder and Beechcraft V35 Bonanza TKS Testimonial

Dave Bosworth lives in the Northwestern United States and primarily flies around the inland Northwest, bridging the Cascades and Rocky Mountains—also called the Inland Empire. For work at Empire Airlines, he flies a Cessna 208B Cargomaster with FIKI-certified TKS Ice Protection. For play, he pilots a Beechcraft V35 Bonanza with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection.

Cessna-208B-FedEx-Super-Cargomaster

How did you get started in aviation?

That’s a 35 year story. I’ve been flying since I was a teenager. I learned to fly in high school, got my pilot’s certificate at 18, and garnered all my ratings to the point where I was flying cargo for a Part 135 carrier in New Mexico. Then I worked for Horizon Airlines here in the Northwest. As my career advanced, I went to Northwest Airlines, United Airlines, Frontier, and now I fly for Empire Airlines here in Idaho.

Why did you choose TKS?

Using TKS wasn’t a choice I made. It was a choice that FedEx made for their entire fleet. When we bought the Bonanza, having the TKS was a nice addition. Something I’m familiar with anyway. It’s such a great ice protector, you couldn’t say no. It’s a great add-on to the airplane.

Dave-Bosworth-Beechcraft-V35-Bonanza-003

What does TKS do for your mission?

It literally means we get completion. Without TKS, there are certainly days when we wouldn’t feel comfortable or confident flying. TKS gives us a higher reliability in the common winter conditions we have here in the Northwest.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

The neat thing about TKS is that it makes things pretty unmemorable. It just works. TKS is an outstanding anti-ice, and it’s a very, very good de-ice. If you managed properly, to use it as an anti-ice system to begin with, you don’t really have a lot of need to use it as a de-ice system. Occasionally you get into those weather conditions where you are truly de-icing the airplane in flight, and when you do that it’s just superb. The only limitation of TKS is how much TKS fluid you can take with you. On our typical flights with the Caravan, the 20.8 gallons of fluid that we have is usually sufficient. It’s very rare when I don’t have enough to complete. In fact, I can think of only one trip out of the last 700 hours where I couldn’t complete the trip because I didn’t have enough TKS fluid.

Have you used any other ice protection systems?

Boots are generally inferior because you can get that cuff of ice on the outside of the boot. Again, if it’s not managed properly boots can be problematic. Boots are more likely to get a hole in them, then they don’t work at all. Truly the best is to have a heated wing. That’s what I had on the Boeing airplanes I flew. All of the hot air is coming out to heat the windshield, leading edge and everything. Short of literally having a turbojet anti-ice/de-icing system, TKS is pretty much second to none.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Cessna 208 FIKI

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

Nico W. – Beechcraft E33 Bonanza TKS Testimonial

Nico W. lives in the Midwest and primarily flies around the Midwest and West Coast. Nico has flown his 1969 Beechcraft E33 Bonanza equipped with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection for 5 years.

Nico W - Beechcraft E33 Bonanza

How did you get started in aviation?

My sister’s father-in-law insisted that I learn to fly.

Why did you choose TKS?

When I moved the plane from California to Minnesota I really liked the idea of an extra insurance policy, so to speak, after a few flights during the winter ended with me turning back after an unexpected cloud layer crept in; the TKS system seemed most appropriate and safest for how the plane was being used.

What did TKS do for your mission?

I’m still not a huge fan of flying when I might encounter icing, but having the TKS system gives me a whole lot of peace of mind in case the unexpected or unanticipated comes up during a flight.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

None – I don’t fly if I know the conditions might result in “truly memorable”; the TKS is a back up insurance for good decision making; I’m delighted it’s never been a “life saver.”

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

Ryan H. – Cessna 182 TKS Testimonial

Ryan H. lives in northern Wisconsin and primarily flies within the Upper Midwest (Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan) and occasionally the Rockies. He is the owner of a 1998 Cessna 182 and has flown the No-Hazard TKS equipped airplane for 6 years.

Ryan H - Cessna 182 NoN

How did you get started in aviation?

I’ve been interested since I was quite young.

Why did you choose TKS?

I had a prior experience with an A36 owner who showed me the system’s icing capabilities and the safety margin it provides.

What did TKS do for your mission?

I frequently use the 182 to go skiing in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Of course, with the Great Lakes there’s frequently icing conditions. It allows me to start and complete those missions with a low danger and anxiety factor. I know I’ve done it so many times, I know the airplane and it gets me there. Even with smart flight planning, you can still get into icing you didn’t expect. TKS will get you out of that, in my experience, at any time without an issue.

Where I go is the Keweenaw Peninsula. It sticks out into Lake Superior and has some of the worst weather in the world. It snows 300 inches there, which is totally different than 300 inches in Colorado. The snow stays around. I’ve never seen so much snow. You come out and there’s a foot and a half of snow on top of your airplane from overnight. How are you going to get it off? You brush it off, flip on the TKS and off you go.

There’s a friend I frequently ski in Michigan with, and he was ranting out on the ramp that the ice was terrible and so on. He gets in the airplane and five minutes later he’s turning off the de-ice because we don’t need it. We found a layer in between the clouds. From five minutes he goes from “This is dangerous” to “We don’t need it anymore.” You see this transformation of flying with other pilots who realize the utility and what TKS brings. From the ground de-icing to the in-air stuff, it just can’t be beat. I don’t see another system that even comes close to this.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

Coming out of Evanston, Wyoming. Over Wyoming the radar didn’t look too bad but we ended up in some pretty bad icing with very few alternate airports around. Having the TKS was absolutely reassuring. Again, the conditions weren’t predicted to be that bad. To be able to just push on through that, knowing that when I came out the backside of it, all would be well. And I had more than enough TKS fluid to get through it. You know, that’s reassuring having your family aboard and being able to say that there’s nothing really to worry about. You can push on. Every experience is memorable.

They compare Dutch Harbor, Alaska to be some of the worst weather to fly in. Horton, Michigan has it beat most days. The average weather up there in the winter are winds at 25 gusting to 35 and heavy snow. Thankfully the runway is lined up to the northwest. They designed it that way. You don’t show up there without solid instrument skills. Other than the FedEx airplanes and the regional jets, there’s one other guy who goes in and out of there. He has a Mooney with TKS.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

Yes. I’ve flown Twin Cessnas with FIKI boots. I personally have an A36 Bonanza that has boots. Although they have their pluses, when the ice is serious or there’s a concern for even moderate icing, you feel a lot more reassured when you have the TKS system.

Additional comments

It can be a ground de-ice. I go out to my airplane. There’s freezing rain. There’s snow. There’s whatever. I had a buddy of mine who had seen it before but he hadn’t seen that much. He taxis to the end of the runway, makes sure it’s all cleared off and takes off. One of the tricks is a mosquito sprayer with TKS in it. The ground de-ice is priceless.

Some people talk about your system and say “It won’t de-ice the airplane.” That’s simply not true. It absolutely will. It takes a few minutes to get there, but it will de-ice an airplane. People think it’s just anti-ice which is true on your lower settings in particular.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Cessna 182

Michael S. – Beechcraft 58 Baron TKS Testimonial

Michael S. lives in West Virginia and primarily flies up and down the East Coast, from New York to Florida. He is the owner of a 1988 Beechcraft 58 Baron with FIKI-certified TKS Ice Protection.

Michael S Beechcraft B58 Baron

How did you get started in aviation?

I took a flying lesson in 1994. From then on I was hooked.

Why did you choose TKS?

I met someone who had TKS. They said it was great, so I installed it on the A36 Bonanza in 1996 and loved it. Then I got a Baron which had boots. 11 years ago, I got TKS when I repainted and got a new interior for the Baron. I always wanted to put it on, I was just waiting for the right time.

What did TKS do for your mission?

It has allowed me to do missions I would not have, and gets me out of icing situations where boots did not do as good of a job.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

Having to go to 18,000 feet to get out of icing, yeah. I had a dangerous situation with boots but never with the TKS.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection system(s)?

Yes, my Baron had boots. TKS is a gazillion times better.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Baron FIKI