Mark Porto – Beechcraft V35B Bonanza TKS Testimonial

Mark Porto lives in the Midwest and flies to Canada (Ontario and Quebec), the Midwest, East Coast and Southeast. He owns a 1970 Beechcraft V35B Bonanza that is equipped with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection. Mark has flown the TKS-equipped aircraft for 2 years.

Mark Porto - Beechcraft V35B Bonanza Side

How did you get started in aviation?

I was one of those kids who always liked airplanes and flying. As soon as I had the money, I walked into a flight school, started taking lessons and eventually bought an airplane. I love flying and fly whenever I have the chance. It has to be a really, really bad day with bad weather for me to not like flying. Otherwise, I’m always happy flying an airplane.

Mark Porto - Beechcraft V35B Bonanza VTail

Why did you choose TKS?

I was looking for a de-icing system because I’m in the Midwest and fly up to Canada. At the time when I was looking, TKS was the only choice for the V-tail.

What does TKS do for your mission?

TKS gives you the extra margin of safety in the event you encounter inadvertent icing. That happens a lot more frequently than I would like. The weather, especially when you go up to Ontario through the Great Lakes, can be unpredictable. It gives you the out you need to make it to your destination or make a change in plans.

Mark Porto - Beechcraft V35B Bonanza Inflight TKS

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

Going into Peterborough, Ontario, a storm came across the lake. Everything was backed up. It came fairly quickly. TKS allowed me the time to divert and land without any issues whatsoever. Another encounter happened flying from Chicago to New York to Bridgeport, Connecticut. Getting into Bridgeport, which is close to the Atlantic, there were no issues. It’s been good. It’s done what I need it to do.

Mark Porto - Beechcraft V35B Bonanza Nose Slinger Ring Propeller

How do other ice protection systems compare to TKS?

I had a Baron that had boots and alcohol. The nice thing about TKS is that the spray from the prop completely keeps the windscreen clean, even without having to deice the windscreen. The prop is almost completely ice-free. I’ve never had any accretion on the tail. You need to turn on and prime the system before you encounter icing, otherwise the system will take a while to de-ice. The boot system has no protection from runback, so you’re going to accrete ice. With the TKS sprayback on a single engine, I never got any ice on the antennas or the windscreen.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

 

Keith Hale – Beechcraft G36 Bonanza TKS Testimonial

Keith Hale is the previous owner of a 2010 Beechcraft G36 Bonanza with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection. He flew the airplane around the East Coast and Midwest for 5 years.

Keith Hale - Beechcraft G36 Bonanza 002 E


Ho
w did you get started in aviation?

My dad always wanted to be a pilot. He and I both took lessons when I was young. He ended up with some medical issues. We both quit, and years later I ended up getting my license.

I flew the airplane for business and for pleasure. Instead of staying a day or two, I could fly up, have lunch with a client or vendor, have a meeting and come back the same day.

IMG_4459

Why did you choose TKS?

The guys at Tornado Alley Turbo told me about TKS. I scheduled the airplane so it came to you first, then directly after to Tornado Alley Turbo. I did a lot of research, talked with CAV and talked with other people. Beechtalk was helpful because there are a lot of pilots on Beechtalk that have TKS.

Before I decided to get TKS, I had just received my instrument rating and flew a Mooney Ovation 3. My wife and I were coming down to South Carolina. The forecast did not call for ice, everything was supposed to be good. Once we climbed out of the mountains, the Mooney started picking up ice. And we kept picking up ice. I was supposed to go to 9,000 feet. I was on an instrument flight plan. There was no break, so I asked for 11,000. I broke out of the clouds at 10,800 feet. The ice sublimated off. It kind of scared my wife and didn’t do anything good for me. When I got the Bonanza, I’d made up my mind at the beginning that I was going to add TKS. Because I didn’t want to do that again. And it didn’t.

IMG_4448

What did TKS do for your mission?

It gave me a good feeling while we were flying. It gave my wife a good feeling while we were flying. Every time we were in and out of the clouds, I didn’t have to worry. Even if I got into bad ice, I knew that the TKS system would keep the ice off long enough for me to do what I was supposed to do, which was to go up, go down or do a 180 to get out.

Running the system was standard operating procedure. During the wintertime in the mountains of Virginia, the very first thing I had to do was climb out of the mountains. There were clouds, which means there was moisture. I turned it on before takeoff, so the TKS system was pressurized. This way when I needed the system it came out quickly, and I didn’t have to sweat the first 5 or 10 minutes.

I never flew into known icing. I don’t like ice, which is obviously why I got the system. A number of times, I did run into it by accident. They weren’t calling for it. Of course, I think a lot of things takes the weatherman by surprise.

Keith Hale - Beechcraft G36 Bonanza 004 E.jpg

Additional comments

Other than testing it, I very seldom had to use the windshield spray bar. The Bonanza had the heated prop from Beech. I was trying to decide “should I keep the heated prop, or should I get slinger ring prop?” I finally decided to get the slinger. It slung out enough fluid to where I very, very seldom had to use the spray bar.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

Jim Jennis – Cessna 182RG + Piper Saratoga II TC TKS Testimonial

Jim Jennis lives in Virginia and flies around the East Coast and Midwest. Jim co-owns a 1979 Cessna 182RG and Piper Saratoga II TC that are equipped with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection. He has flown TKS-equipped aircraft for 10 years.

Jim Jennis - Cessna 182RG N756KZ

Jim Jennis - Piper PA-32 Saratoga II TC.JPG

How did you get started in aviation?

From the time I can remember, which dates back to when I was three years old, aviation is all I ever wanted to do. I quit the Boy Scouts when I was 12 to join the Civil Air Patrol and got my pilot’s license. I’ve been flying since 1975 and am a single engine, multi engine and private pilot.

Why did you choose TKS?

For the Cessna 182, TKS was the only de-ice system available. Me and my partner that own the aircraft are both instrument-rated pilots. We fly a lot year-round, sometimes in adverse weather conditions. TKS was the only de-ice system that was available for the 182. We had flown with TKS and had such good experiences with it.

For the Saratoga, Piper had other options. You could buy boots for the Piper, but we liked TKS so much better than the boots that we went with TKS.

What does TKS do for your mission?

It’s totally opened up the flying mission from October through April. We fly year-round, but in the past we had a lot of issues where we would have to totally scrub a mission and go someplace else with a commercial airliner. Or we would get someplace and have to delay a departure because of the icing conditions that were around. It’s opened up six to seven months of flying for us.

We’re in the Shenandoah Valley which is right between two mountain ranges—the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Appalachian Mountains. They’re not big mountains like in the west, but there’s lots and lots of ice. You get a lot of moisture and a lot of icing conditions in the Appalachians, particularly west of where we live.

Around this part of the country, TKS is most useful when you have a cloud layer on takeoff or landing. We turn the system on before takeoff and then fly up through the cloud layer. It will keep the ice off. After climbing a couple thousand feet, that cloud layer is gone and there’s no more icing. Same thing with descent for an instrument approach. There are potential icing conditions below in the clouds. We turn the system on before the initial descent. Descending through the cloud layer for an approach, we’ve seen the TKS system works really well.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

In November 2017, we had the TKS system put on the 182RG at your former installation center in Salina, Kansas. After it was installed, we flew back to the East Coast. There was a cold front we had to fly through all the way to Illinois. TKS was the only reason we got to Illinois. The cold front overtook us. The next day we had to fly through that from Illinois all the way back to Virginia. It was just amazing what it did for the aircraft.

We took off in conditions where icing was probable but not known for sure. The TKS was able to deal with the icing conditions that we experienced. We never continuously accumulated ice and changed altitudes whenever we needed to get out of it. We used the system during the entire trip. It allowed us to escape and fly safely. That was our first and very memorable experience using the TKS system. It made a believer out of us.

How do other ice protection systems compare to TKS?

What I’ve always liked about TKS is that it spreads the fluid over the wings and provides runback. When I’ve flown in light twins with boots, for example, ice can accumulate back behind the boots. That may cause some issues with airflow of the wings. With TKS, if you get the system started early and get the wings wet, TKS will keep the wings from building up ice behind the surface more effectively than boots.

We’ve had the system on the 182RG for 10 years. It looks and functions like the day it was put on. The workmanship and quality is absolutely superb. If we had boots on the airplane, by now we would be dealing with cracked rubber, multi-thousand dollars’ worth of probable replacements and maintenance.

Maintenance has been great on it. We maintain the TKS system per the user manuals. We’ve changed the filters and turn on the system once a month to clean the panels. They look like brand new. The only thing we’ve done is change the filters per your recommendation. We’ve been really happy with it on both airplanes.

Additional comments

If you are a serious instrument-rated pilot who wants to be concerned about year-round safety and mission operations, you need to invest in TKS. For us, it’s indispensable. Not everyone flies the type of aircraft that we fly. But if you’re flying like we do year-round, I wouldn’t fly an airplane without TKS.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Cessna 182

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Piper Saratoga

 

Bryan Wood – Cessna T210M TKS Testimonial

Bryan Wood is the previous owner of a 1978 Cessna T210M with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection. He flew the airplane around the Midwest for 13 years.

Bryan Wood - Cessna T210M-E


Ho
w did you get started in aviation?

My dad flew in the Air Force. We had planes growing up. Sometimes it was an old taildragger, other times a four place family plane. I bought my first plane in my early 20’s, a little two place Grumman. In college I started taking lessons when I had the money, and as soon as I got out of college I got my license. My whole adult life I have had some type of plane. I love aviation. I love flying. And I love helping others to fly too.

Why did you choose TKS?

When I was looking at buying a Cessna T210, I talked to a guy that flew checks in a Turbo 210 back when banks flew canceled checks. Twice a day he would fly Kansas City – St. Louis – Des Moines. One night he barely made it into the Kansas City downtown airport (KMKC). He landed on a runway that was closed, coming in at full power in a Turbo Cessna 210 that had hot prop, hot plate and boots. His airplane picked up so much ice, he couldn’t shed it. So he put TKS on his plane and that completely eliminated his ice issues altogether. That’s what sold me on the TKS. I bought the 210 because I could put the TKS on it.

What did TKS do for your mission?

TKS gave me the freedom to go when I needed to. I used the airplane a lot, strictly for business—going to trade shows, sales meetings and bid openings. You’re up there in higher altitudes with the T210. Even in April and May at 10,000 feet you’re in freezing temperatures a lot of the time. From fall through spring, it seems like you’re always running into an occasion to turn the TKS on. If you’re flying IFR at all, it’s good insurance to have.

I’ve trusted my life to TKS so many times and have full confidence in the TKS system. It takes a big stress off your mind while you’re flying. When you start picking up ice like I did in my Aztec with boots, you wonder how much ice is going to shed the next time you cycle the boots. TKS lightens your whole mental load.

How does TKS compare with other ice protection systems?

Hands down they’re almost incomparable in runback situations. A lot of times with boots, you cycle them and maybe shed half the ice or three-fourths of the ice. If runback ice is forming, you can turn the ice light on and see ice building up behind the boots on top of the wing. I’ve been in some pretty significant icing situations with the TKS, and the only ice I had when I landed was on unprotected surfaces. It completely keeps the ice from forming and helps prevent runback ice that builds up behind boots.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Cessna 210

Scott Ivany – Cessna 210M FIKI TKS Testimonial

Scott Ivany lives in Colorado and flies everywhere from Alaska to Michigan. Scott’s 1976 Cessna 210M is equipped with a Flight Into Known Icing (FIKI) certified TKS Ice Protection, which he has flown since 2015.

Scott Ivany - Cessna T210M FIKI


Ho
w did you get started in aviation?

My mother was a grade school teacher who got her private pilot’s license when I was a kid. She introduced me to aviation when I was about 9 years old. As soon as I could scrape together enough nickels and dimes, I got my license.

Why did you choose TKS?

I bought the plane with TKS already installed. I recognized that I would be flying over the top of the Rockies. Anytime it’s IMC here in Colorado, you are in the ice, as well as trips east of here. That was one of the main proponents. I also believe TKS adds significant value to my aircraft and utility. I’m not the kind of guy that runs and flies through hard IMC all the time, but being able to punch up or down through a layer to make a trip happen was attractive to me. I fly year-round. In fact, I enjoy flying more in the winter than in the summer.

What does TKS do for your mission?

It makes trips doable when they wouldn’t otherwise be.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

My experiences are that TKS works very well. It’s been able to make trips happen that otherwise just wouldn’t happen. Last February I had a trip to Boise. There were pockets of ice between here and there. It wasn’t steady ice for four or five hours, but there were pockets. You turn the system on when you know you’re going to be heading into icing conditions, and then ten minutes later you come out the other side and don’t have to worry about it. Very nice. It’s peace of mind over the Rockies.

Additional comments

I use my 210 on gravel strips a lot. I was pretty worried about kicking up rocks and damaging the TKS panels. I’ve flown a lot of Idaho backcountry, remote strips in Colorado, and I’ve never had any problems with it.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Cessna 210 FIKI

 

Steven Gerbel – Cessna TTx FIKI TKS Testimonial

Steven Gerbel lives in Chicago and primarily flies within the Midwest. He owns a 2015 Cessna TTx equipped with Flight Into Known Icing (FIKI) certified TKS Ice Protection, and has flown the airplane for 2 years.

Steven Gerbel - 2015 Cessna TTx FIKI 001


Ho
w did you get started in aviation?

I started taking pilot lessons five years ago. Currently I am working on my multi-engine commercial rating.

Why did you choose TKS?

I bought the TTx so I could get the FIKI. That was a huge reason for my purchase. In the Chicagoland area, from October until early May, there is a tremendous amount of moisture around here. Lake Michigan is a moisture producing monster. It is always cloudy. In the Midwest right around the lake, your flying is reduced by probably 40% if you don’t have it in the winter. You can also have days when you encounter icing in the summer. In May and June, you get up where it’s colder. You’re wearing shorts in the plane, but you’ve got clouds and you’re picking up ice.  TKS is even more necessary around here. I know a few pilots/manufacturers representatives based in Minnesota that swear by it. They almost never feel the need to cancel their flights in FIKI-equipped airplanes during the winter because of icing conditions.

Steven Gerbel - 2015 Cessna TTx FIKI 002

What did TKS do for your mission?

It’s allowed me to go and take missions. I remember one vehemently. We were coming from Kansas back to Chicago in March and there were clouds. We were in and out of them continuously. Without the TKS I would not have gone. For the most part, when you get up there you’re confident that you can get over the clouds. But sometimes the clouds are higher than you anticipate. Sometimes there’s a patch of clouds that you just need to go through for 10 minutes. I am very averse; I’m not going to take that chance. Either I’m going to land and wait it out, go really low underneath them if I can, or I’m going to cancel. Most of the time I cancel my trips. TKS has specifically increased my winter flying.

Steven Gerbel - 2015 Cessna TTx FIKI 003

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

No, because I have used it so carefully. Please take that as a compliment. The TKS system has worked extremely well. When I get out of my plane sometimes, on the nose cone there’s ice. But it’s clear on the prop, and on the wings. Maybe there’s ice on the wingtip where it’s unprotected. The tail—the vertical and horizontal stabilizers—are all clean. I’m always kind of shocked at how clean they are. I am a very happy customer.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection Systems

Ralph Rissmiller, Flight Test Pilot – TKS Testimonial

Ralph Rissmiller lives in Wichita, Kansas and flies throughout the United States. He is a DER/ODA UM Flight Test Pilot who has done the full spectrum of ice protection systems down through the certification aspects to get them into service. Ralph has flown flight tests in natural ice, tanker ice and dry air ice. He is the owner of a 1981 Beechcraft A36 Bonanza with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection.

Ralph Rissmiller - Beechcraft A36 Bonanza NH 01Ralph Rismiller’s Beechcraft A36 Bonanza


How did you get started in aviation?

I started flying when I was 14 years old. After a stint in the Air Force, got into the flight test side and stayed with it for the last 38 years.

Why did you choose TKS?

In this particular case, I didn’t make the choice. It was already installed on the airplane when I purchased it. At the time, there was no other ice protection system available for the airplane.

What does TKS do for your mission?

Since I have an inadvertent system, I don’t plan or dispatch into any known ice environment. But it allows me the flexibility that, should unexpected ice occur, it gives me an out.

Forum Thumbnail - Aero Commander 500
Aero Commander 500 Flight Test with Beechcraft King Air 200 Tanker


Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

I’ve done testing on other airplanes with TKS, and those have included some pretty significant icing encounters. Expanding on that, those events occurred during the certification tests for the approval of the TKS Ice Protection System on several different aircraft, all of which were successful and certified. There was a variety of Part 25 of Part 23 airplanes.

I can speak to one test that we did when we were testing the Aero Commander 500. The company operated out of the same base where a fleet of booted 208s were. The Aero Commander pilots reported that a lot of the 208 guys were drooling over the fact that the Aero Commander was clean of ice, and the 208 had a lot of residual ice on it, which kind of supported Cessna’s decision to change to TKS for the 208 ice protection system. TKS is different in its approach. Yes, it’s expendable. But it does either keep off or remove ice, whereas a boot only removes ice that has accumulated and you have to have some in order to remove. You also tend to have more residual ice with the boot.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

I’ve had a lot of experience with various other ice protection systems, mostly while conducting certification tests of them. My experience includes electro-impulse de-icing, pneumatic boots, TKS, bleed air, and electrothermal systems. An evaporative bleed air system tends to be the gold standard, if you will, today.

TKS in my opinion is more effective than pneumatic boots. Additionally, you don’t have to tend to it all the time. You turn it on and let it run. TKS prevents ice accumulation rather than shedding it after you accumulate ice, similar to a running wet bleed air system. Boots don’t have runback. TKS has a little more runback than a running wet bleed air system, because it truly is running back. With the running wet bleed system you can actually get accumulation of rivulets of ice streaming aft on the wing upper surface. With TKS, normally any runback just continues on off the wing, since it’s been mixed with the TKS fluid solution already.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

Clint Davies – Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza TKS Testimonial

Clint Davies lives in New England and flies throughout the Northeast, East Coast, Midwest and occasionally the West Coast. Clint’s 1984 Beechcraft B36TC Bonanza is equipped with No-Hazard TKS Ice Protection, which he has flown since 2010.

Clint-Davies-Beechcraft-Bonanza-B36TC-E


Ho
w did you get started in aviation?

I started flying 40 years ago in high school. I got my private, instrument, commercial, and flight instructor’s licenses when I was in college.  I then worked as a flight instructor and did some charter flying when in graduate school. For the last 30 years I’ve flown mostly for business and personal use, however, I still try to fly to the same standards as when I was flying commercially.

Why did you choose TKS?

The regions that I fly in have ice six to seven months out of the year. I find it everywhere I fly. In Florida during the winter time, ice at 9,000 to 10,000 feet is not unusual. I bought the airplane with a turbocharger so it would give me more options to avoid ice. I find that the TKS, again, helps give me options to avoid ice. For example, if climbing or descending through a layer where ice is suspect, I turn it on.  TKS allows me to handle trips with less stress than in an airplane with no ice capabilities.

What does TKS do for your mission?

Having options allows me to complete my mission much more often. If there are icing conditions I cannot avoid, I will cancel a trip. But I find very often times that there is the potential for icing conditions, and with the TKS system I can lay out a realistic strategy to avoid the ice. For example, flying in clear air above icing conditions is often very feasible with a turbocharged airplane. I can get above the clouds and avoid it. If I have to descend through clouds I turn the TKS system on and, if I do pick up ice, it becomes minimal. The TKS system works pretty well in this regard. It’s not a be all, end all. You have to use judgement with it.

When you have a plan to stay out of icing conditions, TKS makes it realistic to fly that plan. In an airplane without ice protection capabilities, doing so would not be realistic.  For the conditions it’s intended, using the TKS system as an anti-ice and within the capabilities of a Bonanza, it works really well.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

Before I had the TKS system my plane had a hot prop.  While that was helpful, it didn’t give me the confidence to fly the way the TKS system does. In terms of comparisons to other systems, for a piston engine airplane I think the TKS works very well and is better than boots.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Bonanza

Jim N. – Beechcraft 55 Baron FIKI TKS Testimonial

Jim N. lives primarily flies in the Upper Midwest. He is the owner of a 1980 Beechcraft 55 Baron with Flight Into Known Icing (FIKI) certified TKS Ice Protection.

Jim N Beechcraft B55 Baron TKS Ice Protection System

 

Why did you choose TKS?

I originally bought the Baron specifically because I fly over Lake Michigan on a regular basis. A single, even with a parachute, simply does not compare, as survival times in the lake are short, even in the summertime. There have been countless times where there have been forecasts for icing, and the TKS has given me the confidence and ability to fly through. It simply becomes a non-issue.

What does TKS do for your mission?

TKS has been simple to operate and maintain, and has worked flawlessly for years. I would not travel in my Baron without TKS. It has expanded and improved my dispatch rate and increased both my confidence as well as safety. It was well worth the investment.

Have you had any memorable experiences with TKS?

There was one episode that I recall in particular. I was flying westward across Michigan and then Lake Michigan one afternoon in late winter. Everyone on the frequency was reporting ice accumulation, from the surface and well up into the flight levels. ATC was doing their best to accommodate everyone, but it was pretty clear they didn’t have much to work with and nowhere to put people. There were low ceilings everywhere, and then in what seemed to be an instant I started to pick up mixed ice, and quickly. I had already primed the TKS system and was ready. I turned on the TKS, and as usual no further ice accumulated on the wings or tail surfaces. The stuff that had accumulated rapidly turned to slush and fell away. The windshield iced up but was readily freed of ice with TKS from the spray bar. I could see ice covering the landing lights in the wings but all of the visible flying surfaces were clean. There was no risk of runback ice as well. Radio reception started weakening as ice covered the antennas, but a switch to the second radio addressed this problem. I knew from the Nexrad and XM Radio that it was actually clear near the Michigan border of the lake, so I decided to continue. As I crossed Lake Michigan it was fully night, but I could see the ice start to disappear from the windshield. When I landed, there was nearly an inch of mixed ice on the radome and spinners but everything else was entirely clear. Without the TKS I would have been forced to land and spend the night, or possibly faced an even worse outcome. I do not believe the TKS system is for droning along in ice for prolonged periods of time, but is ideally suited for brief periods, knowing there are clear areas ahead.

Have you flown in aircraft with other ice protection systems?

TKS is clearly superior to boots. It does not require maintenance, periodic replacement, and does it not lose any airspeed. It does not require an expensive hot plate or an additional alcohol tank to fill in the nose.

Learn more about TKS Ice Protection for Beechcraft Baron FIKI

 

Cessna P210 – Inadvertent SLD Encounter

Cessna P210 NH SLD Conditions 002

Cessna P210 NH SLD Conditions 001

A TKS-equipped Cessna P210 en route from Oregon had an inadvertent SLD icing encounter at 14,000 feet and exited by climbing.

TKS is not approved for flight into SLD conditions. In an inadvertent SLD encounter such as the one pictured above, a TKS system does have capabilities beyond other ice protection systems. Even with a TKS system, one should always take immediate steps to exit icing conditions should they be encountered.

Find TKS for Your Aircraft

CAV Ice Protection has introduced a new product for the OEM market named SLD Guard, an airborne anti-ice system designed to meet new FAA aircraft certification regulations addressing FIKI conditions containing Supercooled Large Droplets (SLD).